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  • Sky- We define our beauty and worth, nobody else gets to do that for us!

    Sky- We define our beauty and worth, nobody else gets to do that for us!

    Nude photos and art are powerful. Personally, I use them as a way of reclaiming power over my body. They have the capacity to evoke strong emotions which can really drive a message home. In my own creation, nude art contains messages of freedom, liberation, vulnerability, and self-acceptance. There is nothing more raw and real and that is what truly inspires. I feel this sense of inspiration boil over when witnessing individuals of varying shapes, sizes, genders, ethnicities, and sexualities showcasing their nude bodies and art. It is something so natural and beautiful after all, so why hide it? Many of us have had to overcome difficulties in our minds to find the courage to pose nude. It can be such a cathartic and sacred experience when you finally let go of the doubt and take the plunge. In my personal experience, it has been empowering. I would much rather teach people that nude bodies are nothing to be ashamed of than perpetuate the idea that we should hide them in shame. We define our beauty and worth, nobody else gets to do that for us!

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  • Michelle - Rebel Heart

    Michelle - Rebel Heart

    My BEST advice? You are your worst critic. Learn to love yourself and it all falls into place from there. Do NOT listen to the catty drama in the modeling world. It’s never worth it and it only causes you to lose focus. And NEVER compare yourself or your work to others. You are not them, and you never will be. You are you. And nobody else can ever be you. You’re one of a kind and you’ll never be replaced. Live for that NOW!

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  • Ahbee - Every body is beautiful

    Ahbee - Every body is beautiful

    So long as a person's body is out of harm's way, all bodies are beautiful.

    EVERYBODY has their own idea of what is attractive and their own set of kinks. There will always be somebody who finds an individual attractive.

    Just as such there will always be people who will have negative opinions about someone and their appearance. As long as you love yourself and the vessel that carries you, to hell with anybody else's opinion on you, good or bad. 

    Every body is beautiful.

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  • Pinky - Cosplay is fun

    Pinky - Cosplay is fun

    My advice for a beginner cosplayer would be to just be yourself.

    For most people, cosplay is a way to escape reality.

    Just because you cosplay a certain character does not mean you have to act like that character.

    When I cosplay I'm not worried about being too into character, I'm mostly in it to have fun. Which leads into my second piece of advice, have fun. Always have fun when you are doing anything, whether it is for cosplay or not.

    Having fun, to me, is one of the more important parts of cosplaying.

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This Is England

https://www.timeout.com

‘This is England’ was the title under which Humphrey Jennings’s 10-minute paean to beleaguered but indomitable British pluck, ‘The Heart of Britain’, was presented in the US in 1941. After showing the wreckage of Coventry and life in the shadow of the Blitz, the narration forecast that ‘the Nazis will learn, once and for all, that no one with impunity troubles the heart of Britain’. As the opening montage of Shane Meadows’s new film makes clear, the heart of Britain was troubled in 1983.

Cross-cutting between Roland Rat and Maggie Thatcher, rioting and the royal wedding, it’s a nifty scene-setter for a deft, heartfelt local story in which the nation is at a different kind of war, and violent bigotry is not an external threat but literally wraps itself in the flag.

Grieving a father lost in the Falklands, lonely 12-year-old Shaun (Thomas Turgoose) is taken under the wing of a local skinhead gang, which includes the dryly charismatic Woody (Joe Gilgun), appealingly dippy Smell (Rosamund Hanson) and cheerful Milky (Andrew Shim), whose parents are Caribbean. As in any pack, there are pecking orders and face-offs, but the generous-minded ‘spirit of ’69’ prevails – until the older Combo (Stephen Graham) returns from jail exuding the stench of aggressive racism, which can’t quite mask the whiff of something lost, desperate and sad. Soon there is speechifying; vulnerable spots are exploited, lines are drawn and a summer of happy belonging mutates into something darker.

With his Nottingham-centric trilogy (‘Twentyfourseven’, ‘A Room for Romeo Brass’ and ‘Once Upon a Time in the Midlands’) and 2004’s ‘Dead Man’s Shoes’, Meadows has created a body of unmistakably English work, but ‘This Is England’ is the first time nationalism has explicitly underpinned the action. Drawing on the director’s own experiences, the film offers assured insights into the pleasures and wages of tribalism, and the ease with which both the urge to belong and individual insecurities and resentments can be grievously spun into political capital. The St George cross initially seen on a poster of the England squad on Shaun’s bedroom wall becomes a coddling blanket of self-justification, then a badge of self-loathing.

If Shaun’s progress can feel a bit schematic and there’s the odd formal lapse into melodrama, these are outweighed by Meadows’s confident pacing and the superb performances of the young ensemble. Turgoose marvellously captures that awkward stage of early adolescence where a yearning for self-determination can’t quite stretch to independence – he goes to buy bovver boots with his mum – and Graham ensures that Combo is pitiable even at his most vile, while the rest of the gang – many of whom studied together – are relaxed, enjoyable company. The film also pays tribute to the music whose enjoyment initially marked skinheads as early adopters of multiculturalism. Even Combo retains his love of ska – a capacity for transcendence that rhymes with the scenes in Jennings’s film in which a Huddersfield choir sings Handel and Beethoven at the height of hostilities.


BY: BEN WALTERS